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Post Info TOPIC: Learning in the Community


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Learning in the Community
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In this topic, discuss how learning happens in the community.

 

smile We would love to hear your suggestions on what you think:

  • what would be a cool place to learn in? 
  • what would help your learning? 

 

What would this look like?

What would you like to support you in your learning?

What would support your child with their learning?

 

You can write a reply below or post links to videos.



-- Edited by admin on Wednesday 11th of September 2013 03:06:14 PM

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We are trying to get our community more involved in the school and vice versa.
We have St Johns, Nin Ka Do, Netball, League, Scouts, Sea Scouts.
There is a community hall which is available to all groups.
The school and health groups have invited Celia Lashley to come talk to our community about growing boys into good men.

Although formal education may not be a priority in our community there are certainly many groups children and their families can join which provide learning in other areas.

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Jo Stanway- Edendale School

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A community is where the learning should start.    The activities that I was involved in after school when I was a child were greatly beneficial to who I am as a teacher and person now.    We as a family were not involved in every activity going, but a wide range and quality not quantity.  It was a privilege to be able to do out of school activities.  

I also remember local experts being involved in our school all the time, music, art, drama, sport and science.  Using the locals  is something that we are trying more and more to do within our school.  

The saying the school is the heart of the community is sometimes lost.  Maybe we should find it again.

 (This is not all relating to the school I am in now)



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Sharlene Carki, Weston School

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We are working hard to connect with our community but we are always looking for ways to approach it differently.

We have run information evenings for parents on a variety of topics including 21st Century learners, Technology as a tool for learning and how we cater effectively for our Year 7 & 8's.  Our annual Fireworks is a whole community celebration and our biggest fundraiser.  Our Home and School is a great link and they are very proactive.

I have enjoyed the focus that the LCN have given to the importance of connecting with our community and the video clip on this site of the school from Finland shows a clear connection with the community and perhaps gives some insight into what learning in the community could look like.

As every community is different, each school will have a unique journey in finding the way to connect successfully ...



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Siobhan Patterson

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Learning through our community is what springs to mind when I read the posts already in the forum - we are so lucky that the children in our school have the opportunity to be involved in so many activities outside our schools. The challenge and excitement for me is in how we can harness the enthusiasm and excitement that children have for their learning in these contexts and develop clear links for our learners about the connections between learning.

We also have so many people in our communities who have a wealth of knowledge that will enhance the learning for our children - I would really love to see us creating networks across the community where students, parents and teachers have access to expertise outside our own.



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Nicky Ryan

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Our community is involved in learning and our children have the opportunity to utilise different spaces and environments e.g. local hall for bridge games, assemblies, science activities, PE and drama activities. The local Church is also used for our ANZAC services and is visited by children in school time (BIS) and outside of school through community services. We visit the local quarry and wetlands, gardens, Boys Rally.

There are possibilities for wider connections e.g. Local Progress League, historical buildings community members. Our challenge is including our community as engaged learners with us and not just involved as supporters on the sidelines. How to get depth? We did have a local personality work with some of our boys on their interest in Meccano based on his own interest and the level of resources he had. This was highly successful for a few individuals and showed huge potential.



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J. Kitchin & M. Lacek (Weston)

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With an emphasis on teaching science, we find that people in the community come and contribute equipment and ideas. For example, when building a lizard-friendly garden, we have had local quarry men arrive with stone, farming families donating tussocks and logs, arriving at school and taking interest which motivates the children. We have partnered with the Outreach Programme at the University of Otago to extend science lessons in biology, chemistry, and physics. The local Police Department runs programmes such as assault courses, biking sessions, and Keeping Ourselves Safe. We find that all these opportunities broaden the children's experiences and expose them to new challenges.



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N McGregor - Weston School

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Through using 'experts' in the community and from children's families to come in and share their knowledge with the children.  Using local businesses (fish n chip shops, local gardens) to visit.  We have parents and families that come in to help in the school vegie garden and share their knowledge and ideas with groups of children.



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Caroline Hope Carolyn Thelning

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Learning happens as soon as children leave school. Our students are involved in a multitude of clubs, sporting and cultural groups that develop academic, physical and social skills. Our community members frequently come in to school to assist with activities and specialised learning and our students love having these experts in our school. Community members also welcome us in our EOTC events such as visits to the Gallery, library, farms, and Parkside Quarry etc. We also benefit from the enthusiasm from sports clubs such as Sport Otago, North Otago Rugby, etc.



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Anonymous

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I think it is important for schools to have strong connections with their local community.  Utilising local expertise such as kayak instructors, surfers, first aid, police to come along to our senior EOTC has been a good way to get our students out in our community.  We had some other senior students involved in a Science Fair connecting with people in the community.  Some local Bridge volunteers who are passionate about the game of Bridge come into our school once a week to teacher our year 5-8 students how to play this game.



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Sara Brown

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Real learning in our community, not contrived sessions or times to me would look like home.  Children popping in and our of learning varieties.  Children would of course follow their peers and learn positive socialisation.  We have a vege garden, developing lizard garden, tree huts, and awesome teachers with their own passions.  Why not let our kids follow their real interests.  Some out at the garden as they need that for their soul. Some out doing sport with the TIC, or parents or community group.  Kids doing art.  Children building and inventing.  A contract for their reading and maths, to reach achievement then to spend time as they see would best benefit them.  Regular interviews to choosegoals or inquiries.

Number 1, get the job done.  Number 2, choose what you do.  



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